Dec 112013
 

Because of the snow on Thursday I was not able to attend class and fully understand how to set up this portfolio. But I will try my best and accept the consequences. Alas… work from this semester!

 

First up would be some video examples. Here is the video that I worked on with my pod group. We decided to do our video on the sensation Youtube has become over the years.

<iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/KGwk8-GnVrM” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

And here is the video I did myself about history of the internet (skype).

<iframe width=”640″ height=”480″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/uXrneIpZ4BQ” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

Next would be some original photos I’ve taken this semester. Now, for my very first blog post I used a photo taken many years ago. So for this section I’d actually like to show the work I’ve done for my photography class this semester. Considering I’ve published these photos on my photography page on Facebook- and some of them were extremely popular- I’d say these photos have become a bigger part of my networked self than nearly anything else I’ve done online this semester.

Army

This semester I worked on a project that highlighted the differences of women I know and am acquainted with.

Beautiful Scars

 

I hoped that these photos would empower any other women who saw them. I hoped that these photos would show that every woman is beautiful despite the flaws we may have as human beings.

Unashamed

 

The next section would be some examples of writing that I’ve done for this class over the course of the semester. I’ll be honest in saying I’m not exactly sure how I am supposed to format this section of the portfolio, so I will simply transfer some of my favorite posts I’ve done.

 

3.3:

The medium is the message. It’s a widely known phrase throughout the media, but the question of transparency vs anonymity is a lesser known concept.

Transparency is basically expressing yourself exactly as you are on the internet, where as anonymity is using the internet as a faceless communicator. When it comes to media ethics, the differences in anonymity and transparency can evoke completely different reactions.

Many ethical conceptions are widely accepted and those who interact and express themselves online are familiar with them. But I’d say whether a person is using transparency or anonymity can greatly influence ethical decisions on the internet.

I know first hand of this question of ethics. When posting things on Facebook versus something like Tumblr or Reddit, I definitely take into account the fact that everyone on my Facebook knows who I am, where as I haven’t revealed my identity in so many words on other social sites. This allows me to be a little less worried about things I post. Sure I’m already pretty honest and accountable for what I post on sites like Facebook, but having unlimited freedom about what I post or say is also nice.

All in all, the differences between the two greatly affect media ethics in this day and age. The medium that dominates our society today is technology, and conveying messages via technology and the internet says a lot about what people want to say and how they want to say it.

 

2.2:

As a child of the internet age, I will not deny having an intimate relationship with Google and social media outlets. Even those who do not have internet have a relationship through peers and relatives that do interact with the digital world.

Personally, I use Google chrome. I like it because I do not have to actually go to Google’s website to search for anything; I simply type it into my web address bar and Google does the rest for me. Chrome also saves my favorite pages to my home screen, making it easier to navigate to the websites I use most often. Although I have some issues with the fact that Google has pretty much taken over as the only search engine, the ease in using it keeps me coming back every single time.

The fact that Google is basically taking over the Internet is unsettling to me. I use Google, but I never give to Google. I do not click on their ads, I do not keep up with the latest releases, I will not create a profile, and I avoid using Gmail as much as I can. Yes, Google is a great search engine, but I don’t want to support a company that is surely to become a monopoly (if it has not been deemed one already).

 

1.2:

My digital footprint. It’s not very apparent when you simply type my name into Google. There’s a million and one people with the same last name as me, so nothing pops up when you simply search for my name. Even searching for “Olivia Cassidy” doesn’t find anything. When I include my middle name, the only relevant post is actually an obituary column written in honor of my grandfather who passed away in October of 2011.
It’s not until I search my name with things such as “photography” or “Missouri” that I actually start getting search results. Nearly all the results deal with either my photography page on Facebook or this website dedicated to my media class (which will slowly turn into my photography website).
The reason that so little can be found out about me through a simple Google search must do with the fact that any website that has a lot of personal information or photos of me are set at very high privacy levels. Sports and theatre photos taken for my high school publications website are easier to find than photos of myself. And my photography (or photos of others’ photography that I have “shared”) pop up before even one photo of myself.
I’m actually quite pleased by the outcome of this project. I did not find anything that could potentially harm my future, and I found that my photography is easier to find than personal information about myself. Sweet.

 

These have been my favorite posts mainly because of the freedom I had in creating them. I felt like I was allowed to actually express myself and that helped me to formulate my thoughts and put more effort forward.

 

 

Dec 112013
 

When I think of the phrase “the networked self,” I don’t necessarily think of myself as a person. Instead I think of how I exert myself through social media.

I’m quite honest with my close friends, but online I don’t feel as comfortable being completely honest. Speaking face to face with a good friend is very different from speaking to five hundred different people at once- not all of whom I would consider close. My networked self includes acquaintances and people who have slid away from being someone I would regularly speak with.

 

Think about what people are doing on Facebook today. They’re keeping up with their friends and family, but they’re also building an image and identity for themselves, which in a sense is their brand. They’re connecting with the audience that they want to connect to. -Mark Zuckerberg

 

Although I cannot speak for other people, I do believe that most individuals put up some degree of a persona about who they are online. With the parts of communication missing like tone of voice and inflection, most friends I have on social media sites seem much more tame than who they are in the real life; sarcasm is much more scarce, a majority of photos are posed and unnatural, and and major parts of a person’s life are not represented.

But on the other hand, I personally know a few people who do not put any kind of facade on their networked self. They don’t hide behind a computer screen and create a new self, but instead they express themselves wholly through the social mediums of their choice.

I’m not meaning to say that one or the other is bad, because both options have their pros and cons. But I am meaning to say that being completely honest or completely fake are things that could influence your life. And I believe that is something that came from social media that the world was not expecting… that a person’s life can now be changed by a few pictures or text they throw up online.

I believe the only way to truly represent yourself is through interaction and any way other than being yourself (in person) requires some amount of creation and effort. Regardless of how true you try to represent yourself online, too much thought goes into what a person decides to represent on their page; what photos are shown, how much information is revealed, etc. What people pick and choose to represent creates their networked self, regardless of how true to themselves they’re trying to be.

One example would be the infamouse E-Harmony cats video:

E-Harmony

 

Nowadays, your networked self follows you wherever you go. Friends and co-workers comment on media posts, friendships strengthen and weaken through online conversation, and incriminating photos or videos can ruin future prospects. In the case of the video above, the woman has created an image for herself. Although it may have started out as some kind of funny joke, the extensiveness and popularity it gained exaggerated her original intentions. Now that she is an internet-star, her networked self will most likely have taken over her real self. More people recognize her as the E-Harmony crazy cat lady than as the person she truly is.

Even if she had not become such a mega hit, her networked self would still follow her. She knows that the video is out there, and under different conditions that particular video would be a small part of her networked self, but a part nonetheless.

As for my own networked self, I chose to promote my photography and art more than my own self. A simple Google search proves me (somewhat) successful because Olivia Cassidy Photography pops up multiple times while trying to find information about me personally is quite harder to do.

Side view

 

Before almost anything else, search engines bring forward my photography rather than myself. Google photos shows photos I’d taken in high school before any photos of myself come forward. This comforts me because of how information can spread like wildfire throughout the internet. I would much rather my work as a photographer spread and be shared rather than that photo of me at the bar last weekend.

It’s a bit frightening to think that any words or photos an individual posts online are there forever. It makes me cautious, as it should. When I was in high school and Facebook was becoming a huge trend, I heard numerous horror stories about people posting incriminating photos that came back to haunt them when it came to college and job applications.

As much as it can suck, everything that you ever post online is permanent and part of your networked self. Whether you go for transparency or anonymity, you create an image that is represented in the other-world that is online.

Dec 112013
 

Already throughout my lifetime, I have seen social media make a difference. Even though I may not have participated offline, I am able to sign petitions, become part of communities, and spread my own ideas about change. I have signed a variety of petitions through Change.org and the HRC, and my participation online has helped (at least it seems so) make a difference in certain individuals’ lives.

A variety of events are now publicized through social media outlets, including charity and fundraising events. These events help to make a difference in each community that connects and learns through both internet and non-internet based advertising/sharing. I have seen many protests and awareness campaigns in Springfield spread across the social media outlets I normally use. My use of social media is how I learn about things that are important to me and everyday news- since I don’t have cable TV.

I have done my fair share of spreading information about causes I believe in, and when I see disrespect about what I care for I address it. Marriage rights, humanitarian work, and taking care of the environment are just a few things I advocate through social media. With all the prejudice here in the bible belt of Missouri, I feel that by spreading awareness about prejudices present it can help make a positive impact in the community. Knowledge is power.

Dec 112013
 

The medium is the message. It’s a widely known phrase throughout the media, but the question of transparency vs anonymity is a lesser known concept.

Transparency is basically expressing yourself exactly as you are on the internet, where as anonymity is using the internet as a faceless communicator. When it comes to media ethics, the differences in anonymity and transparency can evoke completely different reactions.

Many ethical conceptions are widely accepted and those who interact and express themselves online are familiar with them. But I’d say whether a person is using transparency or anonymity can greatly influence ethical decisions on the internet.

I know first hand of this question of ethics. When posting things on Facebook versus something like Tumblr or Reddit, I definitely take into account the fact that everyone on my Facebook knows who I am, where as I haven’t revealed my identity in so many words on other social sites. This allows me to be a little less worried about things I post. Sure I’m already pretty honest and accountable for what I post on sites like Facebook, but having unlimited freedom about what I post or say is also nice.

All in all, the differences between the two greatly affect media ethics in this day and age. The medium that dominates our society today is technology, and conveying messages via technology and the internet says a lot about what people want to say and how they want to say it.

Nov 122013
 

What might be the “next big thing” to hit the internet, you ask? Well, hell if I know. I bet there is an army of designers and computer science majors already creating anything us everyday folk could imagine. But if I had to take a stab at it, I’d think that the next big thing would be a combination of all the great things on the internet.

Facebook and Skype combining? Could happen. Google Chrome and Firefox creating a partnership? Wouldn’t that be awesome. Tumblr and Flickr creating a combining website? Hell yes.

But what about if all these major outlets combined under one roof? Instead of having to go from site to site, having multiple tabs pulled up on your computer, how about one website that has links to every major networking site? It would be as simple as having a header with an icon for every major website or application that people use nowadays. Google Chrome has the option of putting bookmarks for different websites on your home screen, but what about a header that always stays there? Whether you first go to Facebook or Tumblr, having the option to just flip between websites with the click of an icon.

With cooperation between all social network accounts you have, you’d never have to log on multiple times ever again. Log into one website, click on the icon for another website, and be automatically logged in. You’d never have to open two tabs again!

Nov 122013
 

As a child of the internet age, I will not deny having an intimate relationship with Google and social media outlets. Even those who do not have internet have a relationship through peers and relatives that do interact with the digital world.

Personally, I use Google chrome. I like it because I do not have to actually go to Google’s website to search for anything; I simply type it into my web address bar and Google does the rest for me. Chrome also saves my favorite pages to my home screen, making it easier to navigate to the websites I use most often. Although I have some issues with the fact that Google has pretty much taken over as the only search engine, the ease in using it keeps me coming back every single time.

The fact that Google is basically taking over the Internet is unsettling to me. I use Google, but I never give to Google. I do not click on their ads, I do not keep up with the latest releases, I will not create a profile, and I avoid using Gmail as much as I can. Yes, Google is a great search engine, but I don’t want to support a company that is surely to become a monopoly (if it has not been deemed one already).

Oct 292013
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_google. This Wiki gives everything from early history and financing to how the creators named Google. A simple search in Wikipedia lead me to this article.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28eBTvvT0HA. A short, wordless video made by Google themselves shows major releases and events that have happened throughout the life of Google. Searching youtube brings up this video.

https://www.google.com/intl/en/about/. This Google supported page gives a short overview of what Google has to offer, as well as links to give more information about the search engine. Going to Google.com and clicking on their “about” section leads you to their main page.